Conditions

What Is The Cause Of Your Pain?

Viral hepatitis occurs when the liver becomes inflamed. There are multiple forms of hepatitis; all can be contracted in varying ways and have different treatments.

Symptoms

Most people experience symptoms, however, some do not. Common symptoms of hepatitis include:

  • Yellowing of the skin and eyes
  • Fatigue
  • Abdominal pain
  • Little to no appetite
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Low fever
  • Headaches

About Hepatitis A

Hepatitis A is typically spread through water or food contaminated by feces from someone who is infected. The risk may be heightened for:

  • International travelers
  • People who have sex with an infected person
  • Day care children or employees during epidemics
  • Men who have sex with other men
  • Those who use illegal drugs

Hepatitis A usually goes away on its own within several weeks.

About Hepatitis B

Hepatitis B is spread when body fluids (such as semen or blood) enter an unaffected individual. It can also be transmitted from mother to child during childbirth. The risk may be heightened for:

  • People who have sex with an infected person
  • Men who have sex with other men
  • Having more than one sex partner
  • Injection drug users
  • Infants born from infected mothers
  • Healthcare workers
  • Blood transfusion recipients
  • International travelers

In some cases no treatment is needed for Hepatitis B, while others may include various drugs depending on the individual diagnosis.

About Hepatitis C

Hepatitis C is mainly spread through contact with an infected individual’s blood. The risk may be heightened for:

  • Injection drug users
  • People who have sex with an infected person
  • Having more than one sex partner
  • Healthcare workers

If Hepatitis C doesn't go away on its own within two months, drug treatment should be provided.

About Hepatitis D

Hepatitis D is mainly spread through contact with an infected individual’s blood. The risk may be heightened for:

  • People who have sex with an infected person
  • People who have received a blood transfusion before 1987

Although often chronic, there are various treatments that could be used to combat hepatitis D.

About Hepatitis E

Hepatitis E is mainly spread through food or water that is contaminated by stool from an infected individual. The risk may be heightened for:

  • International travelers, specifically in underdeveloped countries
  • Individuals living in an area where a hepatitis outbreak is common
  • People who have sex with an infected person

Usually, hepatitis E goes away on its own after several weeks or months.

These brief summaries provide only basic information on various types of hepatitis. For more information visit Hepatitis Foundation International, or contact Cary Gastroenterology to be tested and treated.

Your Health Matters

Book an appointment today at one of our office locations throughout the Cary, Raleigh, Holly Springs and Triangle region. We are committed to providing you with the most comprehensive quality of gastroenterology care.

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